8th April 2014

Photoset reblogged from Fresh Slices of Old Florida with 36 notes

oldflorida:

Fiesta of the Five Flags, Pensacola

State Archives of Florida

24th January 2014

Post reblogged from #whatshouldwecallme with 1,358 notes

When someone says they don’t think Arrested Development is funny

whatshouldwecallme:

image

24th January 2014

Photo reblogged from Girl in Four Colors with 199,770 notes

girlinfourcolors:

fantastic-nonsense:

chicketycheckyourprivilege:

militantweasel:

hauntedmarch:

itsthatawesomeperson:

when will america learn….

We won’t learn, because our education system sucks

Instead of treating kids like machines in a factory, being created into obedient workers. It looks like in Finland they’re treated like actual humans.

it’s also because all teachers there have masters’ degrees, and teaching is seen as a prestigious profession like medicine or law.

What’s actually wrong with American schools is not that they’re not like Finnish schools.
What’s wrong with American schools is that they’re an outdated relic of the early 20th century, where the object was to train a child to have the mindset required to work in a factory job long hours of the day, as at the time that mandatory public school was instituted, that was the main expectation of children.
As the industrial age faded and the US entered the era of private sector jobs, the education system failed to reflect that change, and they’re still training us to have the mindset for an industrial job, not a job in today’s job market.
The problem with American schools is not that they’re not like Finnish schools.
The problem with American schools is that they’re preparing us for jobs that no longer exist.

I keep seeing this reblogged as if that system were ever a good and positive thing for children. The American school system wasn’t designed to prepare young adults to enter the work force as free and independent agents. It was designed to indoctrinate children so that they would not complain about the dangerous, monotonous industrial work ahead of them. It was designed by factory owners with the express purpose of quelling working class revolt before it happened. It was designed to repress individual thinking and to increase dependence. Capitalists watched socialism rising up across the world and they designed American schools to ensure it would not happen here.
You want to know what kind of school you get when you apply that thinking to the modern workplace?

This is an example of a Rocketship school, charter schools that target “primarily low-income students in neighborhoods where access to excellent schools is limited.”
How do parents feel about their children being so excellently prepared for the current job market? See for yourself. These schools prey upon low-income communities, especially in areas with high Latin@/Hispanic populations. They’re becoming increasingly popular because they do exactly what the old industrial schools did: they create a workforce. After you’ve spent thirteen formative years of your life in a call center, after all, what more could you possibly want out of life? Education, arts, independent thinking: those things are for rich children.
Stop pretending that “being prepared for jobs” is a GOOD thing to do to CHILDREN.



As a person who went through the public education system and four years of college, I would consider it a good thing if my education HAD prepared me for a job.  I sometimes wonder if I’m living on the same planet as other people when stuff like this comes up.

girlinfourcolors:

fantastic-nonsense:

chicketycheckyourprivilege:

militantweasel:

hauntedmarch:

itsthatawesomeperson:

when will america learn….

We won’t learn, because our education system sucks

Instead of treating kids like machines in a factory, being created into obedient workers. It looks like in Finland they’re treated like actual humans.

it’s also because all teachers there have masters’ degrees, and teaching is seen as a prestigious profession like medicine or law.

What’s actually wrong with American schools is not that they’re not like Finnish schools.

What’s wrong with American schools is that they’re an outdated relic of the early 20th century, where the object was to train a child to have the mindset required to work in a factory job long hours of the day, as at the time that mandatory public school was instituted, that was the main expectation of children.

As the industrial age faded and the US entered the era of private sector jobs, the education system failed to reflect that change, and they’re still training us to have the mindset for an industrial job, not a job in today’s job market.

The problem with American schools is not that they’re not like Finnish schools.

The problem with American schools is that they’re preparing us for jobs that no longer exist.

I keep seeing this reblogged as if that system were ever a good and positive thing for children. The American school system wasn’t designed to prepare young adults to enter the work force as free and independent agents. It was designed to indoctrinate children so that they would not complain about the dangerous, monotonous industrial work ahead of them. It was designed by factory owners with the express purpose of quelling working class revolt before it happened. It was designed to repress individual thinking and to increase dependence. Capitalists watched socialism rising up across the world and they designed American schools to ensure it would not happen here.

You want to know what kind of school you get when you apply that thinking to the modern workplace?

This is an example of a Rocketship school, charter schools that target “primarily low-income students in neighborhoods where access to excellent schools is limited.”

How do parents feel about their children being so excellently prepared for the current job market? See for yourself. These schools prey upon low-income communities, especially in areas with high Latin@/Hispanic populations. They’re becoming increasingly popular because they do exactly what the old industrial schools did: they create a workforce. After you’ve spent thirteen formative years of your life in a call center, after all, what more could you possibly want out of life? Education, arts, independent thinking: those things are for rich children.

Stop pretending that “being prepared for jobs” is a GOOD thing to do to CHILDREN.

As a person who went through the public education system and four years of college, I would consider it a good thing if my education HAD prepared me for a job. I sometimes wonder if I’m living on the same planet as other people when stuff like this comes up.

Source: too-awkward-to-live

5th January 2014

Photo reblogged from People of Color in European Art History with 7,130 notes

medievalpoc:

ARE YOU READY FOR THIS BECAUSE I WASN’T
Unicorn Cookbook Found at the British Library





A long-lost medieval cookbook, containing recipes for hedgehogs, blackbirds and even unicorns, has been discovered at the British Library. Professor Brian Trump of the British Medieval Cookbook Project described the find as near-miraculous. “We’ve been hunting for this book for years. The moment I first set my eyes on it was spine-tingling.”

Detail of a unicorn on the grill in Geoffrey Fule’s cookbook, England, mid-14th century (London, British Library, MS Additional 142012, f. 137r).
Experts believe that the cookbook was compiled by Geoffrey Fule, who worked in the kitchens of Philippa of Hainault, Queen of England (1328-1369). Geoffrey had a reputation for blending unusual flavours – one scholar has called him “the Heston Blumenthal of his day” – and everything points to his hand being behind the compilation.
After recipes for herring, tripe and codswallop (fish stew, a popular dish in the Middle Ages) comes that beginning “Taketh one unicorne”. The recipe calls for the beast to be marinaded in cloves and garlic, and then roasted on a griddle. The cookbook’s compiler, doubtless Geoffrey Fule himself, added pictures in its margins, depicting the unicorn being prepared and then served. Sarah J Biggs, a British Library expert on medieval decoration, commented that “the images are extraordinary, almost exactly as we’d expect them to be, if not better”.

A lady bringing the unicorn’s head to the table (London, British Library, MS Additional 142012, f. 137v).
The recipe for cooking blackbirds is believed to be the origin of the traditional English nursery rhyme “Sing a song of sixpence / A pocket full of rye / Four-and-twenty blackbirds / Baked in a pie.” Professor Trump added that he was tempted to try some of the recipes, but suspected that sourcing ingredients would be challenging. “Unfortunately, they don’t stock unicorn in my local branch of Tesco.”

The remains of the unicorn (London, British Library, MS Additional 142012, f. 138r).
-Sarah J Biggs (British Museum, London)

medievalpoc:

ARE YOU READY FOR THIS BECAUSE I WASN’T

Unicorn Cookbook Found at the British Library

A long-lost medieval cookbook, containing recipes for hedgehogs, blackbirds and even unicorns, has been discovered at the British Library. Professor Brian Trump of the British Medieval Cookbook Project described the find as near-miraculous. “We’ve been hunting for this book for years. The moment I first set my eyes on it was spine-tingling.”

image

Detail of a unicorn on the grill in Geoffrey Fule’s cookbook, England, mid-14th century (London, British Library, MS Additional 142012, f. 137r).

Experts believe that the cookbook was compiled by Geoffrey Fule, who worked in the kitchens of Philippa of Hainault, Queen of England (1328-1369). Geoffrey had a reputation for blending unusual flavours – one scholar has called him “the Heston Blumenthal of his day” – and everything points to his hand being behind the compilation.

After recipes for herring, tripe and codswallop (fish stew, a popular dish in the Middle Ages) comes that beginning “Taketh one unicorne”. The recipe calls for the beast to be marinaded in cloves and garlic, and then roasted on a griddle. The cookbook’s compiler, doubtless Geoffrey Fule himself, added pictures in its margins, depicting the unicorn being prepared and then served. Sarah J Biggs, a British Library expert on medieval decoration, commented that “the images are extraordinary, almost exactly as we’d expect them to be, if not better”.

image

A lady bringing the unicorn’s head to the table (London, British Library, MS Additional 142012, f. 137v).

The recipe for cooking blackbirds is believed to be the origin of the traditional English nursery rhyme “Sing a song of sixpence / A pocket full of rye / Four-and-twenty blackbirds / Baked in a pie.” Professor Trump added that he was tempted to try some of the recipes, but suspected that sourcing ingredients would be challenging. “Unfortunately, they don’t stock unicorn in my local branch of Tesco.”

image

The remains of the unicorn (London, British Library, MS Additional 142012, f. 138r).

-Sarah J Biggs (British Museum, London)

1st January 2014

Photo reblogged from greatest generation with 85 notes

greatestgeneration:

Woody Guthrie’s New Years Rulin’s
Source: The Woody Guthrie Foundation

Resolutions are for suckers.  Rulin’s are where it’s at.

greatestgeneration:

Woody Guthrie’s New Years Rulin’s

Source: The Woody Guthrie Foundation

Resolutions are for suckers.  Rulin’s are where it’s at.

30th December 2013

Photoset reblogged from Honk! Honk! and Voh-dee-o-doh! with 1,458 notes

Tagged: Sochi2014

Source: chalkandwater

29th December 2013

Post

Browsing tumblr is like going to a party where half the people are fun and interesting and half keep yelling at me for stuff I didn’t even do

24th December 2013

Post reblogged from #whatshouldwecallme with 6,927 notes

My family’s reaction when I get off the internet and go downstairs to hang out with them

whatshouldwecallme:

image

Tagged: this is the only one of these that has ever made me LOL

13th December 2013

Photo reblogged from hannah bee with 176,254 notes

dapper-punk:

ordersydney:
african gangsters and their hyenas and baboons

dapper-punk:

ordersydney:

african gangsters and their hyenas and baboons

Source: falconhawk

13th December 2013

Photoset reblogged from Fuckyeahvintage-retro with 437 notes

francisalbertsinatra:

Frank Sinatra attends a baseball game in Los Angeles with wife Mia Farrow and daughters Nancy and Tina, 1966

And Liev Schreiber (in the aviators)

Source: francisalbertsinatra

21st November 2013

Photo reblogged from VICE with 3,723 notes

You’re on drugs!

You’re on drugs!

Tagged: so sad

Source: snailking

21st November 2013

Photoset reblogged from hannah bee with 14,579 notes

crowcrow:

medium:The personalized leather jackets of bomber crews.

Lest we forget these were the guys who ended up forming motorcycle gangs when they got home.  Dig those popped collars.

Tagged: WWII

Source: medium

17th November 2013

Photoset reblogged from Honk! Honk! and Voh-dee-o-doh! with 155,940 notes

Why are we so ashamed of periods? … Women’s bodies are incredibly sexualized in our media and in our every day experiences. So much so that even mentioning menstruation sends a lot of people into kindergarten levels of EW. And why? Because for a moment, you have broken the spell. And suddenly, you are no longer a magical mannequin unicorn fairy existing purely for the sexual fantasy of other people. Suddenly, you’re a human being! (X)

Body functions are gross, y’all.  They’re normal, they’re natural, they’re also gross.  Nobody wants to hear about any of them.

Source: pennyfountain

15th November 2013

Photo reblogged from Top Gear on Tumblr with 244 notes

topgearmag:

James May is obviously the mature one.
Season 19, episode 4

topgearmag:

James May is obviously the mature one.

Season 19, episode 4

15th November 2013

Quote reblogged from The Coquette with 993 notes

How much difference really is there between McDonald’s super-processed food and molecular gastronomy? … If you put a Cheeto on a big white plate in a formal restaurant and serve it with chopsticks and say something like “It is a cornmeal quenelle, extruded at a high speed, and so the extrusion heats the cornmeal ‘polenta’ and flash-cooks it, trapping air and giving it a crispy texture with a striking lightness. It is then dusted with an ‘umami powder’ glutamate and evaporated-dairy-solids blend.” People would go just nuts for that.